Review: Tempest by Beverly Jenkins

Well guys, I goofed.

I had heard about Tempest for awhile and Beverly Jenkins is such a prominent figure in the romance community, so I just chose that one as my intro and jumped in. I did not realize at the time that this was the third and I believe final book in a series. I hate reading books out of order, especially when it becomes clear that references are being made to established characters, and the ending of the novel was essentially wasted on me. However, I never claimed to be a professional and all I can do is give you my impression of the books I read as I read them so let’s do that.

Tempest started strong with the heroine, Regan Carmichael, an african-american woman on her way to meet her husband (Dr. Colton Lee, stoic and swarthy as the day is long) and fulfill her role as mail order bride, shooting the aforementioned fiance. Right away, I was hooked. Obviously it was a case of mistaken identity (she thought he was part of the gang of robbers who had just attacked her carriage and caused the death of one of the drivers) but there’s still something wonderful about shooting your soulmate on sight. From there the pace of the book continued along pretty excellently with seamless introduction of some excellent side characters (looking at you Spring Lee) and realistic challenges (Does he want to marry a lady who shoots on sight? He just isn’t sure and I love him for it). The way Jenkins writes sex is interesting. It was at times incredibly poetic and then unexpectedly violent terms would be used. For example, the first time the heroine orgasms she describes it as “shattering” which took me out of it. That being said, their first sex scene together was the perfect blend of seduction and clear consent and led to complicated feelings for the hero who has only sought out a wife after losing his first wife and mother of his child in childbirth. He isn’t sure how he feels about not just engaging in sex but actively enjoying it with his new bride. And she isn’t sure how she feels about him not being sure how he feels about it. This is all very good and very understandable. After this point, however, I felt the tension slack and the pace did as well.

Essentially after both characters have accepted and realized they love each other (which also did not take as long as I expected), all the oomph went out of the book for me. There were still distinct challenges with someone trying to kill the heroine and the trial for the robbers and the heroine is openly rejected by her husband’s grandfather. But there were things that were written as working so seamlessly it just didn’t feel right. There is a large portrait of the late Adele Lee in the main room and Regan is completely comfortable with this and with her legacy surrounding her and running around in the form of Colton’s daughter Anna. She even goes so far as to talk with the deceased lady in the portrait as though they were old friends. There isn’t a moment of wondering how she would feel about her being there. Regan does worry that Colton, who openly declares at first that he does not intend or expect to love her, will never open his heart to her. But there is no awkwardness with the lady of the house still looming large. To be fair, this was a time in history where people could and did die often from many things, childbirth especially, and it is possible that Regan would truly feel entirely unconcerned by this. From my modern perspective it felt almost forced, as though the author were trying to just cut through any of those feelings by saying “Nope she’s fine let’s move on.” And you know what? That is her right. It just felt weird for me.

Another relationship that was oddly swift and without complication was Anna and Regan’s. Anna is at first a little shy and standoffish, though this is more due to the abuse of her aunt than any hesitation over a new mother coming to take over. I expected more hesitance on Anna’s part. True her mother died before she could know her but her presence has been maintained (see: large portrait) and with her father being too busy to spend time with her it would be normal for her to worry that this new woman would only usurp the very minimal attention she already receives from him. Regan is charming and clever and wonderful with her and their relationship flows without a single question or hiccup. And future hiccups are marched out somewhat quickly and factually and the line between character experience and author giving you a history lesson blends a little to the point where there was a part that I felt should have been a focal point of its own novel instead of being pocketed into this one.

All of that being said, Tempest was a story that I was able to devour in very little time and did keep my attention. It had interesting side characters, representation without denial of the ignorance of the time but also without denying these characters their own agency and happy ending, and though the ending and references to prior characters was lost on me I would be interested in going back and reading them.

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