Review: Never Seduce a Scot by Maya Banks

Never Seduce a Scot is about as cliched HIghlander romance as you can get. It has a frail, petite, virginal heroine and a stoic, warrior hero. It also has a refreshingly consent positive throughline and a well handled enemies to lovers approach.

The plot is a familiar one. Two rival clans are forced into peace via marriage and the two who are chosen – Eveline Armstrong and Graeme Montgomery – are resistant but eventually fall in love. I hesitate to call it enemies to lovers because the tension that’s usually aligned with that is resolved pretty quickly and easily, at least on Eveline’s part.

I like the concept of the enemies to lovers trope but struggle to find reads that feature it which I enjoy because I really need a solid reason for the enemies part and I also don’t like how usually “enemy” is just an excuse for either character to be a flagrant asshole. You can be angry and bitter and vengeful – but don’t be a dick about it. The reasoning in this story is that the hero’s father was killed by the heroine’s father in a battle over a grudge that has lasted for a long time, somewhat like Romeo and Juliet where no one can really remember THE reason and it’s just how things are. Both characters are loathe to wed each other right up till the moment Eveline first “hears” Graeme and then she’s totally on board. Graeme, though recognizing her as a beautiful angel of gorgeousness, is still reluctant because he believes they cannot be together sexually because she is “touched” and he simply refuses to either initiate something with her that she might not fully understand or be able to consent to OR go sleep around with someone else. You love to see it.

Eveline is not mentally altered in any way however – she’s deaf. She can hear some things sometimes, specifically she can somewhat hear Graeme’s voice, but otherwise goes through life by reading people’s lips. This is the result of a horse riding accident and ensuing sickness and she allows people to think she is “simple” to avoid a marriage with a truly disgusting person. I spent half of this book thinking Graeme was just an idiot because he kept asking her questions and getting upset when she wouldn’t answer but in truth it was I who was the idiot as I fell prey to the most common reading mistake ever, forgetting that I knew things other characters did not. When she explains her deafness to Graeme they are able to establish a steadier form of communication. I kept waiting for her to be “cured” by true love or some doctor to have a miracle suddenly but it never happened. Banks actually allowed her heroine to have a disability and showed her find ways to adapt and have her loved ones adapt with her and she gets her happily ever after without having to change.

There are some things that gave me pause. The sex scenes were ok but the hero kept referring to her “woman’s release” and her “woman’s parts” and I feel like the author was going for “this is historical and they use historical phrases” but it took me out of the scenes. So did some of the “historically accurate” sexism like them chiding their little sister for wanting to learn to read (though they do finally allow it).

Overall I appreciated how the families clearly care about each other and the event that leads to the families agreeing to move beyond their feuding past was reasonable. I like that these characters could have been one-note but had conflicting feelings and loyalties and I know I’ll be going back to read the other two in the series when I need a break from my reading challenges. If you’re looking for a classic Highlander romance without the unfortunately common rape heavy plots or stoic to the point of not feeling heroes, this is a good one to try out.

Trigger warning: Eveline does describe being molested and abused by her betrothed (before Graeme) but this is not done graphically and it is brief. Their first time together is also painful for Eveline but she offers repeated, clear consent and the hero is careful to be attentive and gentle.

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