Review: The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson

I read The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson for the “Read a picture book with a human main character from a marginalized community” category of the Book Riot Read Harder Challenge. This was a quick read but it contained a great deal.

The book, written for children ages 5 – 8, speaks to the experience of realizing that you stand out in some way from your peers. For some of the children represented this is due to race, for others it is culture or a disability. Woodson does not sugar coat or pretend away the pain this can cause. She doesn’t make it a metaphor or write that this feeling will never happen again. Instead she acknowledges this feeling, draws parallels between how people can feel this way for many reasons and how valid this is, and then emphasizes that this moment doesn’t diminish their value. Woodson also discusses the way our differences don’t need to be barriers and that while people may ask questions or make you feel like the odd one out, they can also be inclusive and you can be felt seen and accepted in your uniqueness.

Too often the answer to working with people who are different is to just say you “can’t see” those differences, most often coming up when people talk about race. This is an issue for many reasons, chiefly that it attempts to ignore or diminish someone’s identity for personal comfort. Woodson shows children from a very pivotal age where these differences are becoming clearer and socialization, which is filled with biases and prejudices, that you do not have to be the same and you do not have to pretend others are the same as you to benefit from knowing them and accepting them.

Though short it is a powerful piece and I would encourage people who have small children in their lives to get it for them. Even if your child doesn’t stray from the cultural norm of their environment, this is a lesson that needs to be learned by all.