Review: Darkfever by Karen Marie Moning

Trigger Warning: Attempted sexual assault, some graphic violence

Sorry for the unexpected week off, life got a little busy but that did not stop me from reading so you’ll get caught up here pretty quickly.

I read Darkfever by Karen Marie Moning for the “Fae is Bae” category in the Heaving Bosoms Reading Embrace.

It got big Sookie Stackhouse vibes from this heroine. Blond, gorgeous, desired by all who see her, and also gives very detailed descriptions of her “super cute” outfits. The outfits were so 2006 that I actually really enjoyed this part and made me wonder why we stopped caring what characters wore. It gives an interesting insight into the character and also, while aging the book, gives the reader a fun blast from the past. Anyway, I should give a synopsis first.

Mackayla (Mac) is a modern day southern belle who lives with her parents and is eagerly awaiting the return of her big sister and best friend who went to study abroad in Ireland. Her picture perfect world gets shattered when she receives word that her sister was brutally murdered and no one can say how it happened or why. Despite her parent’s protests, Mac goes to Ireland on a one-way ticket determined to discover her sister’s murderer. While there she discovers that she is a sidhe-seer, one who can see the fae. She is taken in by mysterious shop owner Jericho Barrons who also knows of the fae and is seeking the sinsar dubh, a powerful and dangerous book only Mac can help him find.

There are some things this author did that I really enjoyed. First of all, the fae are powerful and manipulative and many of them are evil. Usually we see typically monstrous creatures turned romantic but this time she took typically (in modern media) beautiful, romanticized creatures and took them back to their more monstrous origins. Even the “good” fae represented is a character whose power is making people instantly, overwhelmingly horny and attempts to take advantage of that more than once. The fae are complex creatures that do not adhere to mortal moral codes and that’s an interesting thing we don’t see played with often. Or at least I don’t in the admittedly limited fae reading I’ve done.

The heroine is also unapologetically feminine and feels no shame about it which I also appreciated. She also does not put up with Barrons being condescending or treating her like shit (which he does often). She makes some rookie mistakes but she is a rookie so I’m more than ok with that. The author also does a good job of depicting grief. Mac does not discover the fae are real and suddenly that’s all that matters. Her sister’s death and trying to cope with that and do the basic tasks that are often forgotten, like cleaning up their home and choosing which items to keep or give away, is an equally important, difficult part of her new reality.

There were a couple of things that rankled. The issue of adoption is handled in a way I felt a bit… shitty? Mac discovers her and her sister were adopted by her parents and she falls into a “I have no real family left cuz my sister is dead” spiral which I felt was unfair and honestly gross. Both of my parents were adopted into their families and my older brother is technically my half-brother. It was always important to my family, and to me, that adoption be viewed as an equally valid and legitimate form of creating a family. I never felt that my grandparents weren’t “really” my family, even when I was old enough to understand what adoption meant. Then again, these facts weren’t treated as secrets growing up and it is possible I would have felt differently if I had been the one adopted or if I had found out when I was an adult. This is probably just a personal peeve but I felt it should be mentioned in case others also struggle with adoption plots for whatever reason.

I am interested in where the story goes. My only real big issue is that I genuinely did not like the hero who is clearly going to be the love interest for the heroine. He’s an asshole who gaslights her, threatens her, roughs her up, and gives zero fucks about how he treats her. I’d say he’s an alphahole but I don’t read that kind of hero so I can’t confidently say that he is but if you like heroes who are gorgeous assholes, here’s your man. And listen, no judgment, it’s a type and I salute you and your thirst.