Review: Tomorrow’s Journal by Dominick Cancilla

Trigger Warnings: Mutilation of an infant (off screen but result described), violence throughout, suicide, mention of rape

I read Tomorrow’s Journal by Dominick Cancilla for the “horror book published by an indie press” category in the Book Riot Read Harder Challenge. As I mentioned in my last review, Furnace, I am not a regular consumer of the horror genre. I generally stay in a literary fiction/cozy mystery/romance bubble and I don’t think any of those genres prep you very well for a horror story so I’m going into this at a disadvantage.

Basic premise: A teenage girl finds a journal in her bedroom that can communicate with her and enlists her help in preventing a terrible future. Her primary obstacle is her own disbelief and feeling of powerlessness in the face of impending doom.

I’m not sure how I felt about this story. Most of the time I was just incredibly aggravated by the protagonist, which was absolutely intentional as the reader is supposed to feel what they’re feeling. And they definitely succeeded! But I don’t really enjoy reading something where the main person is just irritating. You can be evil, manipulative, even cowardly but if you’re irritating and boring I just don’t get invested. The premise was interesting but also paced weirdly in reveals? It’s hard to do worldbuilding in an epistolary work but definitely not impossible and I think it would have helped if there had been a bit more context provided as it went even without revealing the Big Twists.

I wanted to like the story but ultimately it’s just a book that fulfilled a challenge purpose but didn’t really interest me in going further in the genre. I’m determined to find horror out there I can get into, some of the classics definitely have and The Girl in the Well was interesting, but I think I’m still looking for a contemporary work I really get into.

 

Review: Furnace by Livia Llewellyn

Trigger warnings: Graphic, violent sexual assault in the last three stories, grotesque imagery, graphic violence

Second book club review of the year! We read Furnace by Livia Llewellyn with our February genre of Horror.

I feel so torn about this book.

When I read the reviews for it I feel like I’m just not the right audience or maybe I just didn’t “get it” because I tried really hard but for the most part I’m left… meh.

The book is a series of horror vignettes with no solid throughline except that most of them are set in the Pacific Northwest.

My experience through 75% of this book was reading, feeling like I understood what was going on, paying attention carefully, and then the ending things would happen and I would be left feeling like I was waiting for something to happen. But it never did. I mean, things most certainly happened, but they didn’t impact me much. I felt horror at times but never fear and I know those are two separate feelings but it still surprised me that at no point was I scared or even uneasy.

The author’s writing is fucking gorgeous. Her talent for writing is undeniable.

But.

I am a firm believer that if you are going to depict sexual assault or make that a major point of focus in your work, you need to justify the hell out of it. Both the choice to include it and the choice to depict the scene graphically on the page. In the first story that really went for it with using it as a major plot point it is an epistolary vignette from the perspective of a young teen girl. It isn’t even written in a way that feels fearful, it just felt like it was trying to shock the reader by how awful it all was. It was a cheap shot at shocking people and I was thoroughly disgusted by it. The second story also featured a rape. A very graphic, violent rape enacted by a demon who has been stalking this woman since she was a child. I get it, demons do evil shit, if this had been the only or maybe even the first story to depict assault I would have been a bit more resigned with it but it was right after that other one and I felt a firm strike two had been struck. The third and final story was the third, and perhaps most damning, strike. A woman is fucked hard and rough and even though she tells him repeatedly to slow down and that he’s hurting her his only response is “make me” and then later he treats her gently before another rough fucking and she decides to stay with him. This was horrific in its clear depiction of, I felt, a domestic abuse relationship but I don’t know if that is what the author intended. By this time the book was done and I was left feeling bitterly disappointed.

Maybe I just need to read more horror, maybe this just isn’t a genre for me, or maybe this just isn’t the right author for me. I really tried to enjoy it. I did enjoy a few of the stories. But when it came to those last few were rape was used so cheaply and without any warning anywhere in the copy or reviews, I felt soured on the whole experience.